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Jelly Donuts

Jelly Donuts


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In a small bowl, dissolve the yeast in warm water and let it stand for about 5 minutes or until foamy.

In a large bowl, combine the yeast mixture, milk, sugar, vanilla, salt, and flour. Mix the ingredients until smooth and soft but not sticky. If using a mixer, mix on low speed for a few minutes until a shaggy dough forms. Add the butter, increase speed to medium, and mix until dough is smooth.

Grease another large bowel with oil. Form the dough into a ball. Place dough in the bowl, turning to coat with oil. Cover with plastic wrap or a damp towel. Set aside in a warm spot and let rise until doubled in size, about 1 to 1 ½ hours.

Lightly flour a baking sheet or surface (a large wooden square block is perfect for this). Turn the dough onto the floured surface and, using a rolling pin, roll out until about ½-inch thick. Using a lightly floured 2-inch round biscuit cutter, cut out as many rounds as possible (should have 25 or more). Place on a lightly floured sheet or surface, spacing them apart. Again, loosely cover with plastic wrap or a damp towel, and let rise until doubled in size, about 20-30 minutes.

Heat the oil in a deep-fryer, large skillet, or large pot to 350 degrees. Using a flat spatula, carefully slide the dough rounds into the hot oil and, working in batches to avoid overcrowding, fry until they rise to the surface, then turn over and fry until puffy and golden brown (2-3 minutes). Drain on paper towels.

When the donuts have cooled, using a paring knife, cut a small slit in the side of the donut, and fill this center with jelly (about 1 tablespoon), using a pastry injector, syringe, piping bag, or small spoon. Sprinkle with powdered sugar and serve immediately.


Baked Jelly Filled Donuts Recipe

Baked jelly filled donuts are easy to make at home. This recipe makes a fluffy donut that is as good as any donut you get at a bakery!

Jelly filled donuts are delicious when made from scratch. I prefer using yeast and then baking the donuts to achieve the ultimate texture so they taste like they come straight from a bakery. They turn out fluffy and sweet every time! Brush the donuts in butter, roll them in sugar and fill with your favorite kind of jam. What’s not to like?

Why this recipe works: The recipe yields soft, pillow-y donuts. Instant yeast makes rising time easy and reliable. The donuts are baked in the oven, which is easier than frying them in oil.


Recipe Summary

  • 2 tablespoons active dry yeast
  • 1/2 cup warm water (100 to 110 degrees)
  • 1/4 cup plus 1 teaspoon granulated sugar, plus more for rolling
  • 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, plus more for surface and as needed
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 3 cups vegetable oil, plus more for bowl
  • 1 cup confectioners' sugar
  • 3 tablespoons milk
  • 3/4 cup thick jam, strained

In a small bowl, combine yeast, warm water, and 1 teaspoon granulated sugar. Let stand until foamy, about 10 minutes.

Place flour in a large bowl. Form a well in the center add eggs, yeast mixture, remaining 1/4 cup granulated sugar, the butter, nutmeg, and salt. Using a wooden spoon, stir until a sticky dough forms. Turn out dough onto a well-floured work surface knead until dough is smooth, soft, and bounces back when poked with a finger, about 8 minutes (add more flour if necessary). Place in an oiled bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let stand in a warm, draft-free spot until doubled in size, 1 to 1 1/2 hours.

Turn out dough onto a lightly floured work surface, and, using a lightly floured rolling pin, roll out dough to 1/4-inch thickness. Using a 2 1/2-inch round cutter, cut out 20 rounds, re-rolling scraps as necessary. Transfer to a lightly floured baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise 20 minutes.

Whisk together confectioners' sugar and milk in a medium, shallow bowl until smooth. Cover glaze with plastic wrap and set aside until ready to fill doughnuts.

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, heat oil until a deep-fry thermometer registers 370 degrees. Using a slotted spoon, carefully slip 4 dough rounds into the oil. Fry until golden, turning once, about 1 minute on each side. Transfer to a paper towel-lined baking sheet to drain. Repeat process with remaining dough rounds.

Fill a pastry bag fitted with a coupler and small bismark pastry tip for filling (such as #230) with the jam. Using a chopstick or a wooden skewer, make a hole in the side of each doughnut. Fit the pastry tip into the hole, and pipe about 2 teaspoons jam into doughnut. Repeat with remaining doughnuts and jam.

Dip tops of doughnuts in the glaze to cover. Let stand, glaze-side up, until set.


Recipe Summary

  • 3 eggs, beaten
  • ½ cup milk
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla extract
  • ¼ cup sugar
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • canola oil
  • 10 slices white bread
  • strawberry (or any flavor) jam
  • confectioners' sugar

In a bowl, stir together eggs, milk, vanilla, and sugar until well blended and sugar is dissolved. In a separate bowl, mix flour with baking powder and salt. Gradually stir flour mixture into egg mixture until no lumps remain. Set aside.

Heat oil in deep-fryer to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C).

Make sandwiches with the bread, spreading jam evenly in the center. Trim away crusts, and cut each sandwich into quarters, wiping away any excess jam. Dip each quarter into batter, coating completely.

Working in batches to avoid overcrowding, fry sandwiches for 1 to 3 minutes, or until puffy and golden brown. Drain and cool on a paper towel-lined wire rack. Sprinkle with powdered sugar. Serve warm.


Steps to make Hanukkah Jelly Donuts (Sufganiyot)

Prepare yeast mix

In a small mixing bowl, stir yeast, 1 tablespoon flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, and water to combine. Mix well, cover, and set aside until mixture begins to foam.

Prepare batter

In a separate large bowl, mix remaining 3 cups of flour, melted margarine, salt, remaining sugar, and egg yolks until well combined.

Add prepared yeast mix and water

Add prepared yeast mix and slowly pour in the remaining water. Mix well to combine until a smooth batter forms.

Cover bowl with a kitchen towel and set aside in a warm place for about 1½-2 hours to rise until batter has doubled in volume. Once risen, punch down to release any excess air.

Prepare donuts

Roll out dough onto a floured surface, about ¾-inch thickness and use a round cookie cutter with a 2½ - to 3-inch diameter to cut circles out of the dough.

Add jelly

Place a dollop of jelly or jam in the center of each circle.

Seal donuts

Cover with another circle of dough, making sure that 2 circles attach well to form a closed ball with jelly or jam in the center - the sufganiyot.

Second rise

Cover the doughnuts with a clean, slightly damp kitchen tea towel and set aside for 45 minutes to 1 hour to rise and puff up.

Prepare baking sheet

Line a large serving plate or platter with a few layers of paper towels and set aside.

Heat oil

Pour 2-inches of oil into a deep, heavy-bottomed pot or saucepan and bring to a medium-high heat until a deep-fry thermometer reaches 350°F/180°C.

Cook donuts

Working in batches, carefully drop a few doughnuts into the hot oil, not too many at a time. Fry the doughnuts on both sides for about 2-3 minutes per side until puffed and golden brown.

Drain

Using a slotted spoon, transfer donuts to paper towels to drain excess oil.

Serve

Cool slightly before sprinkling with powdered sugar for serving.

Try our easy to follow Hanukkah Jelly Donuts (Sufganiyot) recipe for yourself and serve your family a new and fresh treat. Cut out all the unnecessary ingredients and keep your treats simple and delicious. Let us know what you think and tag #cookmerecipes online to share your donut creations with us!

Lilly is an enthusiastic and cheerful young mom. She knows as well as any parent that children can be really picky when it comes to food. And she’s had plenty of experience trying to cook meals that are both tasty and nutritious, and able to satisfy the tastes of a fussy kid right away! To save you some precious time, Lilly's going to share with you all the tricks she learned the hard way, so you don’t have to! She has a wealth of recipes for quick and easy meals for kids and families on a budget.


Easy Jelly Doughnut Holes

Which is your favorite doughnut: cake, or yeast-raised? If your answer is cake, you're in luck — these jelly doughnuts, made from a simple baking powder dough, are fast, easy. and absolutely delicious.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups (241g) King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
  • 2 tablespoons (25g) sugar
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons (4 1/2 teaspoons) baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup (227g) lukewarm milk
  • 4 tablespoons (57g) butter, melted
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, optional

Instructions

Get out a skillet that's at least 2 1/2" deep a 10" electric frying pan is a great choice, if you have one. Fill it with about 1" of vegetable oil, peanut oil preferred for best flavor.

Start heating the oil to 350°F while you make the doughnut batter.

To make the doughnuts: Whisk together the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt.

Whisk together the lukewarm milk, melted butter, egg, and vanilla.

Stir the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients to make a thick batter (or soft dough).

When the oil has come up to temperature, use a tablespoon cookie scoop (or spoon) to drop balls of batter into the hot oil. This recipe will make 2" doughnut holes using a tablespoon cookie scoop and dropping in balls of dough about as big as an undersized ping pong ball.

Fry the doughnut holes for 2 minutes on the first side, or until they're a deep golden brown. Some of them may turn themselves over that's OK, just use a pair of tongs to turn them back. After 2 minutes, turn the holes over, and fry for an additional 2 minutes, until golden brown. Transfer the doughnut holes to a baking sheet lined with paper towels to drain and cool.

When the doughnuts are cool, use a piping bag with a long, plain tip to fill them with as much jelly as you like. If you don't have a piping bag, try using an inexpensive plastic condiment squeeze bottle (think mustard or ketchup), with its tip cut off midway down to make it wider.

Shake the filled doughnuts gently in a bag of granulated sugar. Enjoy warm, or store at room temperature, loosely covered, for a day or so.


Reviews

Super yummy! DO start the oil when you begin the last rise. if you're not used to frying, it takes a long time to get the oil temp correct. I used buttermilk in place of milk, and they were great!

good recipe, but I think 375F is way too hot - the donuts turned brown in seconds.

This was my first try at doughnuts - these were the best doughnuts we have ever had. The dough was a breeze to make. I used plain lowfat kefir instead of milk. They were soft and pillowy. We made holes with the scraps and rolled them in cinnamon and sugar.

These were easy and delicious! I brought them to a Chanukah dinner. I'm not Jewish, but my friends said they tasted just like the traditional ones. I added 1 tsp of vanilla and an extra Tb of sugar. The batter was not too sweet, so the jelly filling and toppings round it out well (we topped some with powdered sugar and some with sugar and cinnamon). I first rolled the dough a little thin - probably 1/4" - and then rerolled the scraps around 1/2" thick (as suggested in the recipe). Both batches came out delicious. The thinner dough simply led to smaller, crisper donuts the thicker dough resulted in larger, doughier donuts. The hardest part was constantly monitoring the oil temperature - as it fluctuated (and as my doughnut size fluctuated), so did cook time. Cook time ranged from 1:15 to 2:00 per doughnut (although 2 minutes was the really the max and only when my oil got too cool). YUM!

These were delicious! We substituted buttermilk for the milk which added some flavor. They were not very sweet so adding a bit more sugar makes them tastier. We also thought that adding some vanilla to the dough next time might be nice. We think 2 tsp of jam is a better amount. Enjoy!

This recipes needs more flavor. Even when i filled them with apple filling, and rolled them in cinnamon & sugar they did not blow me away. The dough should have had some sort of citrus flavor, or even a hint of spice. A plus for this recipe is that they are pretty easy to produce, and have a very soft and fluffy texture. Hence I give it two forks

These were amazing! We made them for Hanukkah and were blown away. I didn't think it was possible to make such good doughnuts at home. The dough was simple and easy to work with. I dipped the doughnuts in a simple powdered sugar glaze after they had cooled a bit instead of dusting with sugar, only because that is what we prefer. Delicious!

Wow! These are fantastic and Krispy Kreme will never EVER compare. I served them right out of the oil and topped with a dollop of butter cream icing on each. I recommend cherry jam, it worked for me for excellent flavor. The time it takes to make these is totally worth it.

Awesome. These were the best doughnuts I've ever had. Next time I might try them with buttermilk to make them even better. The were definitely at their peak the day they were made, the leftovers weren't as good as the first day. I made half apricot, half cherry and glazed them with almond flavored icing. Amazing. Best Krapfen ever.

The best homemade doughnuts one can make. I added glazing by mixing icing sugar, vanilla essence, and water. So big, so rich, and so delicious!

This is a GREAT recipie, I call them Fastnachts. for those of you who are too shy to say "Krapfen". These are eaten by Germanic people before Lent begins thus the name "Fastnacht". It is always so difficult to find good recipies on the internet for German and Austrian desserts, if you like Viennese pastry, this is a must!

My mom used to make doughnuts with my sister and I when we were little. It's a challenge to improve on those excellent memories, but these are definitely worth making! Very cute and not as difficult as youɽ think. The extra step, cutting twice to trim, is worth it for perfectly formed little doughnuts. I made raspberry ones for a picnic and strawberry for a brunch. everyone loved them (though no one asked for the recipe. most couldn't believe someone would be crazy enough to make jelly doughnuts from scratch.) I didn't have exact cutters, so used a juice glass for the larger rounds they looked great and rose fine. Best if eaten within a few hours.

Krapfen, were these good! After frying, try rolling them in cinnamon-sugar. They are best eaten right away, while still hot. Worth the effort.

First of all, any excuse to make a dish named "Krapfen" and announce to your guests that "the Krapfen is ready" or "Come and get the Krapfen" is worth it, but besides the name, the recipe is great, such a crowd pleaser, I used two jams, a home made apricot and also a boysenberry then quartered them and dusted heavily, and I mean heavily, it really helps since the dough is not too sweet, to serve. drove people wild, they hovered over the fryer waiting for the next batch to arrive. KRAPFEN!

These were fantastic. I made them for a doughnut and cider party on a Saturday night. I followed the recipe exactly and used homemade raspberry jam, but I did glaze them at the end instead of using a sprinkle of powdered sugar. They were so delicious I only got one because everyone ate them, so I made them again the next day! They aren't as hard as they seem and the instructions were great. Try them!


Jelly Doughnuts Recipe | How to Make Jelly Donuts

Alcohol helps the donut achieve a crispy texture on the outside and an airy texture on the inside. The alcohol evaporates during frying, so you will not feel the alcohol in any way. If you prefer not to use alcohol, you can skip it.

Why are you frying the donuts with the parchment paper?

This step is very important. If touch/lift donuts with your hands, you may damage the texture of the donuts, therefor, you should fry them directly with the paper, it will keep them nice and round.

What fillings can we use?

You can fill the donuts with any kind of jelly/jam strawberry, blueberry, grape etc. You also can fill them with Nutella, pastry cream, dolce de leche and more.

How to shape the donuts?

As you can see in the video, the donuts can be shaped in two ways: cutting circles using a cookie cutter or rolling into balls. I highly recommend going on the second method, shaping small balls. This ways, the donuts will be fluffier, more round and keep their shape easily.

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  • Tres Leches Cake
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Share it with us on Instagram and tag @thecookingfoodie so we can see your cooking adventures!


To begin, combine the warm water and yeast in a small bowl and let sit until foamy, about 5 minutes.

Warm water helps activate the yeast. The temperature doesn’t need to be exact so no need to use a thermometer just try to get it about the temperature of bath water. (If you place your hand under the stream of water in the faucet, it should feel hot but you should be able to leave your hand there without it stinging.)

Add the egg yolks, 2 tablespoons of oil, and vanilla to the water/yeast mixture and whisk with a fork until combined.

Meanwhile, in a large bowl, combine the flour, confectioners’ sugar, salt, and nutmeg.

Add the liquid mixture to the flour mixture.

Stir with rubber spatula until the dough comes together. It should be a bit sticky.

Cover the bowl with plastic wrap (no need to clean it first).

Let the dough rise on the countertop until doubled in size, 1 to 2 hours.

Line a baking sheet with a few layers of paper towels. Line another baking sheet with ­parchment paper and dust heavily with flour. Generously dust a clean countertop and your hands with flour. Scrape the dough out of the bowl onto the counter and dust the dough with flour.

Pat the dough into 1/4-in-thick rectangle, making sure the bottom doesn’t stick and adding more flour to the counter and your hands as needed.

It should be about 10 to 12 inches in size.

Using a pizza wheel or very sharp knife, cut the dough into 24 two-inch squares. Sufganiyot are traditionally round but I much prefer to make them square — you don’t need to worry about having the right-sized cookie cutter or patching together scraps of dough.

Transfer the dough squares to the floured baking sheet, leaving a little space between the squares. Sprinkle the squares lightly with flour.

Add enough of oil to a large Dutch oven or heavy pot to measure about 2 inches deep and heat over medium heat to 350°F. (If you don’t have a candy/deep-fry thermometer, drop a 1-in cube of bread in the oil if it takes about 1 minute to get golden brown, the oil is at the right temperature.) Place 6 dough pieces in the oil and fry until golden brown, about 3 minutes, flipping halfway through frying.

Adjust the heat, if necessary, to maintain the oil temperature between 325°F and 350°F.

Using a slotted spoon, transfer the donuts to the paper towel-lined baking sheet. Repeat with the remaining donuts.

Use a paring knife to puncture the side of each to form a pocket in the center.

Place the tip of a squeeze bottle or piping bag into the pocket and squeeze 1 to 2 teaspoons of jam or jelly inside. (Alternatively, if you don’t have the right tools or just don’t want to bother, serve the filling on the side.)

Using a fine sieve, dust the donuts generously with confectioners’ sugar. Serve warm.


Jelly Donuts

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Donut-shop jelly donuts can be tasty even when the filling looks industrial and shiny, but these deliciously rich jelly donuts are the real thing. Start with the dough for our Basic Yeast Donuts. Cut the risen dough in circles, let them rise again, and fry. The final step is creating a pocket in the center of each donut, filling with your favorite jelly or jam, and tossing in sugar to coat.

Special equipment: For this recipe, you’ll need a smooth-sided biscuit cutter measuring 2 1/2 to 3 inches in diameter and a pastry bag fitted with a small tip.

If you need more recipe ideas, check out all of Chowhound’s donut recipes.

Instructions

  1. 1 Mix the dough, let it rise, and roll it out to a 1/4-inch thickness following the directions in step 1. Cut out rounds using a 2-1/2- to 3-inch biscuit cutter with smooth sides. Follow the directions to proof and fry the donuts.
  2. 2 Working with 1 round at a time and using a paring knife or a wooden skewer, carefully carve a small opening in the side of each round, forming a cavity. Fill a piping bag fitted with a small tip, or a plastic bag with a small corner cut out, with the jam or jelly. Pipe 1 or 2 tablespoons into each donut round.
  3. 3 Fill a shallow bowl with the granulated sugar and toss the filled donuts until they’re evenly coated.